Bravely Q&A with Pauline Weger and Alicia Williamson of Quotabelle

What prompted you to write Bravely?

As we were sourcing quotations for our first two books and Quotabelle.com (our patented digital inspiration gallery), we were stunned by how difficult it was to find words associated with cornerstone topics, like bravery, courage, ingenuity, and creativity, that were written or said by women. In the US, these are founding ideals that remain widely celebrated today. Women have always embodied and shaped these values, yet what they have to say about them is still largely missing from the larger cultural narrative. We wanted to help bring balance to the conversation. So we set out to gather some of those overlooked voices and different perspectives that expand America’s story and make it more reflective of who we are as a nation.

For the companion Bravely Journal, we took the premise of the book a step further. We crafted a guided way to capture your personal story and map your own possible paths, inspired by women and girls from around the world.

Did you know that the theme of the Bravely book and journal would be so timely?

We had no idea how incredibly timely the topic would be when we began working on Bravely. The stories in it celebrate everyday heroes, like the millions of courageous people who stepped up in whatever way they could to help us through the global coronavirus pandemic. The book and journal also offer inspiration to carry on when you need a boost and contain plenty of ideas for charting paths forward.

Gifting the Bravely collection is a meaningful way to say ‘thank you’ to all the everyday heroes in our lives. It’s also a wonderful way to introduce a world of new muses and role models to students as they reset and restart, whether coming out of an unprecedented disruption or returning to school after a break.

What inspired the design of Bravely?

Too many captivating true stories remain in dark corners or on dusty shelves. We’ve intentionally designed Quotabelle’s products to “gift” the inspiring ideas and stories of women, and we’ve written and packaged these words in a way that makes them a joy to discover and share. When you want to dig deeper, we’ve provided sources and our online site, quotabelle.com, so that you can further explore each quote and its context.

Filled with engaging ideas, stories, and prompts with valuable takeaways, the Bravely book and journal are already being used as creative facilitation tools by teachers and leaders at universities, schools, companies and nonprofits.

How do you hope Bravely will prompt more trailblazers?

We’re optimistic that we’re headed into a new era for women and girls. To prepare them for leading, inventing, creating, advocating, and trailblazing, it’s important to know where we have been. Real-life stories of female groundbreakers help today’s women and girls see what’s possible. The world is experiencing an acceleration of “firsts” as women move to the front and center of more narratives. We couldn’t be more thrilled.

One creative way to personalize the book or journal that you gift is to inscribe an inspiring quote by one of today’s phenomenal women and girls—it could even be your own—on the front pages of Bravely. We’ve captured some of our recent favorites below.

“Dream with ambition. Lead with conviction. And see yourselves in a way that others will not simply because they haven’t seen it before, but know we will applaud you every step of the way.”

– Kamala Harris, US Vice President

“Being successful means being happy with who you are and what you’ve accomplished. If you can maintain a sense of humor, sleep well at night, and feel good about looking yourself in the mirror, you’re doing ok.”

– Kim Ng, General Manager, Miami Marlins

“For there is always light.

If only we’re brave enough to see it.

If only we’re brave enough to be it.”

– Amanda Gorman, United States’ first Youth Poet Laureate and youngest inaugural poet

“Observe, brainstorm, research, build, and communicate.”

– Gitanjali Rao, 15-year-old scientist and inventor, TIME Magazine’s first-ever Kid of the Year